Fiche Film
Cinéma/TV
MOYEN Métrage | 2002
Gacaca – Vivre encore ensemble au Rwanda ?
Anne Aghion
Titre anglais : Gacaca – Living Together Again in Rwanda?
Pays concerné : Rwanda
Réalisateur(s) : Anne Aghion
Avec : Anne Aghion, Philip Brooks, Laurent Bocahut
Durée : 55
Genre : société
Type : documentaire

Français

In 1994, decades of politically motivated ethnic scapegoating culminated in a wholesale slaughter of the Rwanda’s Tutsi minority, along with many Hutu moderates. Vast numbers of ordinary citizens became killers-some willingly and some by force. More than 800,000 lives were taken, and the country was left in a state of devastation.

Under a new government, Rwanda is rebuilding its infrastructure, but its most difficult task is to reconcile the Hutu and Tutsi. Venturing into the rural heart of the nation, GACACA, LIVING TOGETHER AGAIN IN RWANDA? follows the first steps in a bold experiment: the Gacaca (Ga-CHA-cha) Tribunals.

The Gacaca Tribunals represent a remarkable democratization of justice for a people accustomed to dictatorial authority. The Tribunals offer a voice, and perhaps a therapeutic catharsis, to survivors. However, the system is fraught with potential pitfalls: minimally trained judges will be assigned complex cases, false accusations or confessions are possible, revenge or fear of revenge will affect testimonies, inconsistent application of the law, etc.

English

In 1994, decades of politically motivated ethnic scapegoating culminated in a wholesale slaughter of the Rwanda’s Tutsi minority, along with many Hutu moderates. Vast numbers of ordinary citizens became killers-some willingly and some by force. More than 800,000 lives were taken, and the country was left in a state of devastation.

Under a new government, Rwanda is rebuilding its infrastructure, but its most difficult task is to reconcile the Hutu and Tutsi. Venturing into the rural heart of the nation, GACACA, LIVING TOGETHER AGAIN IN RWANDA? follows the first steps in a bold experiment: the Gacaca (Ga-CHA-cha) Tribunals.

The Gacaca Tribunals represent a remarkable democratization of justice for a people accustomed to dictatorial authority. The Tribunals offer a voice, and perhaps a therapeutic catharsis, to survivors. However, the system is fraught with potential pitfalls: minimally trained judges will be assigned complex cases, false accusations or confessions are possible, revenge or fear of revenge will affect testimonies, inconsistent application of the law, etc.

The film crew was then present when the nearly 1,000 Rwandans were gathered for the first of a series of open-air « Pre-Gacaca » hearings. Amidst a people renowned for their reserve, Anne Aghion spent six weeks recording the intertwining stories of survivors and prisoners, and their visions of the future.



Directed by Anne Aghion
Produced by Philip Brooks, Laurent Bocahut & Anne Aghion

« The film captures quite precisely much of what is most compelling and unsettling about Rwanda’s quest for justice after genocide and, more: it captures the feel of Rwanda, the landscape, the texture of the place, the rhythm of speech and movement, the weird brilliance of colors amid the gloom of the spirit. »
-Philip Gourevitch, Author, We wish to inform you that tomorrow we will be killed with our families, Stories from Rwanda


« The most nuanced and intelligent film I have seen to date on Rwanda after the genocide: it depicts both the pain of the past and the complexity of trying to establish justice and move towards reconciliation. With patience and respect, she allows Rwandans to express very moving comments about their experiences and emotions. Beautiful, sad, but ultimately perhaps hopeful, the film never preaches but rather educates in a profound way. »Professor Alison des Forges, State University of New York at Buffalo, Senior Adviser to the Africa Division of Human Rights Watch, Author, Leave None to Tell the Story: Genocide in Rwanda


« An excellent film. It lets Rwandans speak about the challenges of rebuilding a life, a sense of community, and a system of justice after atrocious violence [and]avoids the pitfalls so many documentaries fall into… An excellent pedagogical tool for classes on Rwanda, on transitional justice, or on reconciliation and reintegration. »
Peter Uvin, Director of the Institute for Human Security, Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, Author, Aiding Violence, the Development Enterprise in Rwanda


FESTIVALS

✮2003 Human Rights Watch Film Festival
✮2003 Amnesty International Film Festival
✮2003 African Studies Association Conference Film Festival